Showing You The Way Forward
  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Car Accidents
  4.  » New tech tool seeks to promote motorcyclists’ safety

New tech tool seeks to promote motorcyclists’ safety

On Behalf of | Jul 9, 2020 | Car Accidents

The reasons why drivers of passenger vehicles often cause accidents that injure or even kill other parties are many and diverse. Here are some prime contributors that up the odds for crash outcomes:

  • Dangerous driving behaviors like speeding, lane weaving and tailgating
  • Improper signaling and turning
  • Distracted/reckless driving
  • Behind-the-wheel intoxication

And, of course, the victims of negligent motorists are also varied and diverse. They range from drivers and occupants in other passenger vehicles and bicyclists to pedestrians and more.

Like motorcyclists, for instance. In fact, that riding demographic is at pronounced risk at all times, a point we duly make at the established Louisiana personal injury law firm of Simien & Simien. We stress on our website that bikers “are sometimes difficult to see on the road, and typically drivers are not looking out for them.”

Safety regulators, law enforcers and manufacturers closely note that fact. Their discussions involving motorcycles often revolve around needed improvements in bike technology that will promote crash-free outcomes.

Global auto and motorcycle company BMW is now a major player in that realm. The company’s development of so-called Active Cruise Control on-board technology is now being recognized – and lauded – for its enhanced capability to literally help riders steer clear of roadway hazards.

Cruise control is reportedly a clear upgrade from prior tech assists. Its software interacts with radar to help riders consistently keep a safe distance away from other vehicles. And it can monitor traffic ahead by as much as 300 feet.

That will instill added confidence in any rider. As an in-depth article on the recently developed technology notes, though, it is ultimately a bike’s rider and not its safety systems that will predominantly influence behind-the-wheel roadway outcomes.